• Journal Article

Discriminative stimulus effects of site-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists in NPC 17742-trained rats and squirrel monkeys

Citation

Wiley, J., Li, H., & Balster, R. L. (1997). Discriminative stimulus effects of site-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists in NPC 17742-trained rats and squirrel monkeys. Psychopharmacology, 132(4), 382-388.

Abstract

Drug discrimination studies in rats and monkeys with competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists an training drugs have shown that these drugs typically cross-substitute for each other, whereas phencyclidine (PCP)-like NMDA channel blockers produce partial, if any, substitution. In the present study, rats and squirrel monkeys were trained to discriminate the competitive NMDA antagonist, NPC 17742, from vehicle in a two-lever drug discrimination procedure for food reinforcement. The competitive NMDA antagonists, NPC 12626, SDZ EAA 494 (D-CPPene), and MDL 100,453 fully substituted for NPC 17742 in monkeys or in rats. The relative potencies of these compounds were similar across species. Open channel blockers, PCP and dizocilpine, and the tricyclic antidepressant and low affinity PCP-site ligand, desipramine, produced minimal responding on the NPC 17742-associated lever in rats or monkeys. The glycine-site modulators, (+)-HA-966, ACEA 1021 and milacemide, and the polyamine/NR2B-selective antagonist, eliprodil, also failed to substitute fully for NPC 17742 in rats and monkeys. These data complement and extend results of previous studies which have shown a lack of PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects of these non-competitive NMDA antagonists by further showing that they also do not share discriminative stimulus effects with those produced by many competitive NMDA antagonists. These observations would support a prediction that differences in side-effect profiles should emerge among types of NMDA antagonists