• Journal Article

Discriminant analysis of medical-care use among shipboard U. S. Navy men and women

Citation

Schwerin, M., & Corcoran, K. J. (1998). Discriminant analysis of medical-care use among shipboard U. S. Navy men and women. Military Psychology, 10(3), 147-158. DOI: 10.1207/s15327876mp1003_1

Abstract

A matched sample of men and women in the US. Navy (N = 1,068) were examined in a study of shipboard medical-care use. The instrument used in this study is theoretically based on the Health Beliefs Model (HBM). Theoretically, the HBM attempts to explain health-seeking behavior by describing the antecedent conditions within the individual. Preliminary chi-square results indicate statistically significant gender differences in health-care use. Separate discriminant function analyses were employed for men and women. Results for each separate discriminant function analysis yielded a single statistically significant function for female crewmembers only. Univariate F-ratio results between female medicalusers and nonusers show that users have significantly higher ratings of health value, health comparison, and reason barriers (e.g., I already see thedoctor a lot). Maleusers and nonusers differ in that users have significantly higher ratings of medical-care satisfaction, whereas nonusers have significantly higher motivation barriers. Implications of these findings and the efficacy of the HBM are discussed.