• Journal Article

Developmental toxicity evaluation of Bendectin in CD rats

Citation

Tyl, R., Price, C., Marr, M., & Kimmel, C. A. (1988). Developmental toxicity evaluation of Bendectin in CD rats. Teratology, 37(6), 539-552.

Abstract

Bendectin, composed of doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine HCl (1:1), is an antinauseant previously prescribed for nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. The present study examined the maternal and developmental effects of Bendectin (0, 200, 500, or 800 mg/kg/day, po) administered to timed-pregnant CD rats (36-41/group) during organogenesis (gestational days [gd] 6-15). At death (gd 20), all live fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal abnormalities. At 500 and 800 mg/kg/day, maternal toxicity included reduced food consumption during treatment and for the gestation period, increased water consumption in the posttreatment period, reduced weight gain during treatment, and sedation; water consumption was reduced during treatment and for the gestation period, and maternal mortality (17.1%) was observed only at the high dose. Developmental toxicity included reduced prenatal viability (800 mg/kg/day) and reduced fetal body weight/litter (500 and 800 mg/kg/day). In addition, reduced ossification of metacarpals (800 mg/kg/day), phalanges of the forelimbs (500 and 800 mg/kg/day), and of caudal vertebral centra (all doses) was observed. No increase in percent malformed live fetuses/litter was observed. The proportion of litters with one or more malformed fetuses was higher than vehicle controls only at 800 mg/kg/day, with short 13th rib (to which the test species is predisposed) as the predominant observation. By contrast, a positive control agent (nitrofen, 50 mg/kg/day, po, 14 dams) produced 85% malformed fetuses/litter with the predominant malformation being diaphragmatic hernia. In conclusion, the incidence of litters with one or more malformed fetuses was increased only at a dose of Bendectin which produced maternal mortality (17.1%) and other indices of maternal and developmental toxicity (see Discussion)