• Journal Article

A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the First Federally Funded Antismoking Campaign

Citation

Xu, X., Alexander, R. L., Simpson, S., Goates, S., Nonnemaker, J., Davis, K., & McAfee, T. (2015). A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the First Federally Funded Antismoking Campaign. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 48(3), 318-325. DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.10.011

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In 2012, CDC launched the first federally funded national mass media antismoking campaign. The Tips From Former Smokers (Tips) campaign resulted in a 12% relative increase in population-level quit attempts. PURPOSE: Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in 2013 to evaluate Tips from a funding agency's perspective. METHODS: Estimates of sustained cessations; premature deaths averted; undiscounted life years (LYs) saved; and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained by Tips were estimated. RESULTS: Tips saved about 179,099 QALYs and prevented 17,109 premature deaths in the U.S. With the campaign cost of roughly $48 million, Tips spent approximately $480 per quitter, $2,819 per premature death averted, $393 per LY saved, and $268 per QALY gained. CONCLUSIONS: Tips was not only successful at reducing smoking-attributable morbidity and mortality but also was a highly cost-effective mass media intervention