• Journal Article

The contribution of executive functioning to academic achievement among male adolescents

Citation

Elkovitch, N., Latzman, R., Young, J., & Clark, L. A. (2009). The contribution of executive functioning to academic achievement among male adolescents. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 32(5), 455-462. [PII 915712162]. DOI: 10.1080/13803390903164363

Abstract

Recent factor analytic work suggests that the dimensions of conceptual flexibility, monitoring, and inhibition are distinguishable under the executive functioning (EF) umbrella. We examine relations between these constructs and performances on academic achievement tests among a sample of 11–16-year-old males (N = 151). EF contributed to the prediction of all academic domains beyond general intellectual functioning in distinct ways: Conceptual flexibility predicted reading and science, monitoring predicted reading and social studies, and inhibition predicted mathematics and science. These findings suggest that demands related to specific academic domains access different cognitive abilities and have implications for both intervention and research science.