• Journal Article

Cigar and pipe smoking in the U.S. military: prevalence, trends, and correlates

Citation

Sanchez, R., & Bray, R. (2001). Cigar and pipe smoking in the U.S. military: prevalence, trends, and correlates. Military Medicine, 166(10), 903-908.

Abstract

This article examines the prevalence, trends, and correlates in cigar/pipe smoking and their relation to cigarette smoking among active duty U.S. military personnel. An examination of the trends in cigar/pipe smoking was conducted with data from 1985 to 1998, and predictors of smoking were determined for 1998. Rates of cigar/pipe smoking declined from 1985 until about 1992 and then began to increase. From 1995 to 1998, there was a 75% increase in the prevalence of cigar/pipe smoking. Greater prevalence of cigar/pipe smoking was associated with male gender, younger age, relatively favorable beliefs and values toward smoking, and being a current cigarette smoker. Findings indicate a notable increase in past-year cigar/pipe smoking. These findings suggest that military tobacco prevention and early intervention programs would benefit from including components that deal specifically with cigar and pipe use in addition to cigarette smoking