• Journal Article

A breath sampling device for measuring human exposure to volatile organic compounds in microgravity

Citation

Raymer, J., Thomas, K., Pellizzari, E., Whitaker, D., Cooper, S., Limero, T., & James, J. T. (1994). A breath sampling device for measuring human exposure to volatile organic compounds in microgravity. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 65(4), 353-360.

Abstract

A compact device for the collection of alveolar air (breath) from humans aboard spacecraft was developed. The system uses silicone one-way valves that operate independent of gravity, and provide minimal backpressure. Small charcoal filters clean ambient air used for inhalation. The device provided good recoveries of organic compounds at the 20 ng/L level, with generally low carryover of these compounds to a blank sample following a sample at exposure to 100 ng/L. When water accumulated in the system, this carryover increased for highly water soluble compounds. The new device was used in parallel with a larger, previously developed alveolar air sampler that requires gravity for proper operation; comparable results were obtained with the two units. The device measures 47 x 34 x 11.4 cm and weighs approximately 3.2 kg. Sufficient space is available within the case to accommodate a number of sample collection options