• Journal Article

Audio computer-assisted self-interviewing in reproductive health research: reliability assessment among women in Harare, Zimbabwe

Citation

Minnis, A., Muchini, A., Shiboski, S., Mwale, M., Morrison, C., Chipato, T., & Padian, N. (2007). Audio computer-assisted self-interviewing in reproductive health research: reliability assessment among women in Harare, Zimbabwe. Contraception, 75(1), 59-65.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Research on the measurement of HIV risk demonstrates that interview mode can affect reporting; however, few studies have applied these findings to assessments of hormonal contraceptive use. This paper examines how audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) influenced reports of hormonal contraceptive use and pregnancy among Zimbabwean women. METHODS: Using a prospective, randomized, cross-over design, we compared self-reports obtained with ACASI and face-to-face (FTF) interview among 655 women enrolled in a prospective study on hormonal contraceptive use and HIV acquisition. In addition, self-report data were compared to those collected during clinical exams. RESULTS: Compared to FTF interviews, reports of hormonal contraceptive use were lower in ACASI [odds ratio (OR)=0.6; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.5-0.6], and reports of pregnancy were higher (OR=1.5; 95% CI=1.1-1.9). Both modes of self-report differed from records on contraceptive method disbursement. CONCLUSION: Although ACASI yielded higher reports of several reproductive health behaviors, discrepancies between self-reports and clinical data on method disbursement highlight persistent measurement challenges