• Journal Article

Asthma: resource use and costs for inhaled corticosteroid vs leukotriene modifier treatment--a meta-analysis

Citation

Halpern, M., Khan, Z. M., Stanford, R. H., Spayde, K. M., & Golubiewski, M. (2003). Asthma: resource use and costs for inhaled corticosteroid vs leukotriene modifier treatment--a meta-analysis. Journal of Family Practice, 52(5), 382-389.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of inhaled corticosteroid treatment with leukotriene modifier treatment on medical resource use and costs for asthma patients. STUDY DESIGN: Meta-analysis combining results from published and unpublished studies. DATA SOURCES: Studies were identified from the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the GlaxoSmithKline internal database study registers. Two independent reviewers evaluated the identified studies; studies meeting specified inclusion criteria were abstracted and summarized by meta-analysis with a random effects model. OUTCOMES MEASURED: Hospitalization rate, emergency department visit rate, emergency department costs, drug costs, total asthma-related costs, and total medical care costs. RESULTS: Patients taking inhaled corticosteroids had: a significantly lower annual rate of hospitalization than those taking leukotriene modifiers (2.2% vs 4.3%, respectively; P<.05); a greater decline in hospitalization rate (before vs after therapy initiation) than those taking leukotriene modifiers (decline of 2.4% vs 0.55%; P<.01); a lower annual rate of emergency department visits than those taking leukotriene modifiers (6.2% vs 7.7%; P<.005); lower total asthma-related medical costs than those taking leukotriene modifiers (P<.05) and a 17% reduction in overall total medical care costs (P not significant). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with asthma treated with inhaled corticosteroids have significantly fewer asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department visits and lower total asthma-related health care costs than patients treated with leukotriene modifiers. These meta-analysis findings are consistent with results from randomized controlled trials showing improvements in lung function for patients taking inhaled corticosteroids as opposed to leukotriene modifiers