• Journal Article

Utilization of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) testing in the United States: a case study of T3 translational research

Citation

Lynch, J. A., Khoury, M. J., Borzecki, A., Cromwell, J., Hayman, L. L., Ponte, P. R., ... Lathan, C. S. (2013). Utilization of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) testing in the United States: a case study of T3 translational research. Genetics in Medicine, 15(8), 630-638. DOI: 10.1038/gim.2013.5

Abstract

Purpose: We examined hospital use of the epidermal growth factor receptor assay in patients with lung cancer in the United States. Our goal was to inform the development of a model to predict phase 3 translation of guideline-directed molecular diagnostic tests. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study. Using logistic regression, we analyzed the association between hospitals' institutional and regional characteristics and the likelihood that an epidermal growth factor receptor assay would be ordered. Results: Significant institutional predictors included affiliation with an academic medical center (odds ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.83), participation in a National Cancer Institute clinical research cooperative group (odds ratio, 2.06, 1.66-2.55), and availability of positron emission tomography scan (odds ratio, 1.44, 1.07-1.94) and cardiothoracic surgery (odds ratio, 1.90, 1.52-2.37) services. Significant regional predictors included metropolitan county (odds ratio, 2.08, 1.48-2.91), population with above-average education (odds ratio, 1.46, 1.09-1.96), and population with above-average income (odds ratio, 1.46, 1.04-2.05). Distance from a National Cancer Institute cancer center was a negative predictor (odds ratio, 0.996, 0.995-0.998), with a 34% decrease in likelihood for every 100 miles. Conclusion: In 2010, only 12% of US acute-care hospitals ordered the epidermal growth factor receptor assay, suggesting that most patients with lung cancer did not have access to this test. This case study illustrated the need for: (i) increased dissemination and implementation research, and (ii) interventions to improve adoption of guideline-directed molecular diagnostic tests by community hospitals