• Report

Using cross-segmental data effectively to support alignment: How K-12 and postsecondary educators can access, examine, and use cross-segmental data to frame discussions about student transition and success in college

Citation

Radwin, D., & Hensley, E. (2012). Using cross-segmental data effectively to support alignment: How K-12 and postsecondary educators can access, examine, and use cross-segmental data to frame discussions about student transition and success in college. New York, NY: College Board Advocacy & Policy Center.

Abstract

The implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) over the coming years will provide an opportunity for K–12 and postsecondary educators to share and use data effectively to support alignment between the sectors and reduce the need for remedial education. This brief describes how these groups can work together to make the most of data and their shared expertise to increase the proportion of students who are college ready. It also provides a framework for collecting data and information on the critical goal of improving college readiness,
including data on related outcomes, processes, and inputs. In an upcoming report, we will provide recommendations for key data and other information that can be used to support specific goals and strategies being developed by Affinity Network teams.

College readiness can be defined as students’ ability to successfully complete introductory, credit-bearing, college-level courses in mathematics and English (reading, writing, or both) and possibly other subjects. This conception of college readiness assumes a sharp dichotomy — a student is either ready for college or not — but could be extended to include different gradations of readiness. In practical terms, a student’s college readiness in a subject can be measured in
multiple ways, including earning a sufficiently high score on a relevant exam or assessment, neither needing nor taking remedial courses, passing an introductory college-level course, or otherwise being deemed by a counselor or instructor at the college as having the capacity to succeed.