• Presentation

From Use Cases to Tech Visits: A Demonstration of the Development and Deployment of Multi-Channel Passive Monitoring Systems for Longitudinal Exposure Surveys

Citation

Kilpatrick, G. L., Furberg, R., Weger, S. A., Causey, E. F., Kizakevich, P., Duncan, S., & Whitmore, R. (2009, May). From Use Cases to Tech Visits: A Demonstration of the Development and Deployment of Multi-Channel Passive Monitoring Systems for Longitudinal Exposure Surveys. Presented at AAPOR 2009, .

Abstract

The Platforms for Integrated Longitudinal Exposure Studies (PFILES) project was conducted through a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency. The program’s purpose was to develop novel methods for gathering human factors data related to environmental exposures that would ensure both high quality data and low participant burden. Burden needed to be sufficiently low that participants would likely participate in studies for at least 1 week per season for 1 year.

Centered on a Pocket PC, the data collection system integrates forms-based diaries and questionnaires with a collection of wireless peripheral devices for monitoring physical and physiological data. Diary information is acquired for activity, exertion level, diet, product use, geographical location, and microenvironment conditions. Heart rate, microenvironment proximity, key fob-activated product-use, GPS, and other data are collected using wearable devices linked via Bluetooth wireless connections.

Passive monitoring, including monitoring of residential microenvironments, allows for data to be used in indirect models of environmental exposure. According to Klepeis (20:51, 29 November 2005), “The main advantage of the indirect approach is that it can be used to rapidly and inexpensively calculate estimates of exposure over a wide range of exposure scenarios.” The PFILES passive monitoring system was designed to be modular. As such, parts of the system work independently, but also have the capacity to be incorporated into other established systems. The motivation for the modular design was to allow for a high degree of flexibility among end-user investigators who might favor using certain configurations of passive monitors, depending on the characteristics of subjects and context, including environment and activity levels of study participants.

We will display the passive monitoring systems employed in our pilot studies and will demonstrate the interface with the pocket PC. Modifications made between pilot studies aimed at reducing participant burden will be discussed during the session.