• Article

A systematic review of the impact of malaria prevention in pregnancy on low birth weight and maternal anemia

BACKGROUND: Malaria in pregnancy is a significant contributor to adverse pregnancy outcome, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. Prevention with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) during pregnancy has been recommended in malaria-endemic areas but concerns remain about its benefit. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association between recommended preventative SP programs in pregnancy and low birth weight (LBW) and maternal anemia through available clinical trial, observational, and programmatic evaluation studies. SEARCH STRATEGY: Systematic review of published studies on malaria in pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes. SELECTION CRITERIA: Clinical studies from Sub-Saharan Africa from the past 10years were included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: English articles published since 2002 and listed in PubMed were identified using defined keywords, and their source documents were reviewed. Thirty-three studies involving malaria in pregnancy that recorded treatment rates and birth outcomes were included. MAIN RESULTS: SP use among primigravidae was consistently associated with decreased LBW and anemia rates in clinical trials. Effects were less consistent in observational studies. CONCLUSIONS: Although randomized trials have demonstrated the efficacy of SP, studies evaluating scale-up programs found less consistent reductions in LBW and maternal anemia. Additional strategies to improve SP coverage may reduce the LBW and maternal anemia associated with malaria in pregnancy

Citation

McClure, E., Goldenberg, RL., Dent, AE., & Meshnick, SR. (2013). A systematic review of the impact of malaria prevention in pregnancy on low birth weight and maternal anemia. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, 121(2), 103-109. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2012.12.014