• Journal Article

A systematic review of complication risks for HIV-positive patients undergoing invasive dental procedures

Citation

Patton, L. L., Shugars, D. A., & Bonito, A. (2002). A systematic review of complication risks for HIV-positive patients undergoing invasive dental procedures. Journal of the American Dental Association, 133(2), 195-203.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This systematic literature review determined the strength of evidence regarding whether patients with human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, are at higher risk of developing complications from invasive oral procedures than similar patients without HIV. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: MEDLINE and EMBASE searches of the English literature from the early 1980s through April 2000 yielded five articles meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria: original research, concurrent treatment of HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects, presence of complications (for example, local or systemic infection, bleeding, alveolitis, delayed healing) resulting from extractions, orthognathic surgery, periodontal therapy, endodontic therapy, placement of dental implants, prophylaxis, or scaling and root planing. RESULTS: The authors found no studies involving orthognathic surgery, periodontal therapy, dental implants, prophylaxis, or scaling and root planing, and only one study reporting few immediate endodontic therapeutic complications. Thus, the evidence is insufficient with respect to any additional risk associated with these procedures among people with HIV/AIDS. Because of the few studies, low overall complication rates and variability in results from different analytic approaches, the authors consider the evidence to be too poor to rule in or out a meaningful relationship between HIV status and complications from tooth extractions. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Limited published scientific evidence is available to guide clinicians in regard to possible increased risks of invasive oral procedures associated with the HIV status of the patient