• Journal Article

Suicidal or Self-Harming Ideation in Military Personnel Transitioning to Civilian Life

Citation

Mansfield, A., Bender, R., Hourani, L., & Larson, G. E. (2011). Suicidal or Self-Harming Ideation in Military Personnel Transitioning to Civilian Life. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 41(4), 392-405. DOI: 10.1111/j.1943-278X.2011.00039.x

Abstract

Suicides have markedly increased among military personnel in recent years. We used path analysis to examine factors associated with suicidal/self-harming ideation among male Navy and Marine Corps personnel transitioning to civilian life. Roughly 7% of men (Sailors = 5.3%, Marines = 9.0%) reported ideation during the previous 30 days. Results suggest that combat exposure, substance abuse, and resilience are associated with suicidal ideation/self-harming thoughts through the mediation of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and/or depression symptoms. Substance abuse plays a moderating role. Resilience had a direct effect only among the Marines. Implications for improving the transition to civilian life are discussed.