• Journal Article

Separation of drug effects on timing and behavioral inhibition by increased stimulus control

Citation

Wiley, J., Compton, A. D., & Golden, K. M. (2000). Separation of drug effects on timing and behavioral inhibition by increased stimulus control. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 8(4), 451-461.

Abstract

Impulsive behavior may represent, in part, a failure of behavioral inhibition (the ability to delay or inhibit a response). In this study, use of a multiple signaled-unsignaled differential-reinforcement-of-low-rates (DRL) 15-s schedule allowed examination of drug effects in conditions in which level of stimulus control differed. Results showed that whereas diazepam increased premature responding during signaled and unsignaled DRL components, amphetamine and Delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol increased premature responding primarily during unsignaled components when timing was necessary for efficient performance on the task. In contrast, pimozide and desipramine increased long-delay responses across both components, resulting in longer mean interresponse times. Collectively, these results suggest that the use of different levels of stimulus control may aid in separation of drug effects on timing and other behavioral processes, including behavioral inhibition