• Journal Article

Risk Factors for Post-Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Discharge Mortality among Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

Citation

De Jesus, L. C., Pappas, A., Shankaran, S., Kendrick, D., Das, A., Higgins, R. D., ... Walsh, M. C. (2012). Risk Factors for Post-Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Discharge Mortality among Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants. Journal of Pediatrics, 161(1), 70-74.e2. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.12.038

Abstract

Objective The study goal was to evaluate maternal and neonatal risk factors associated with post-neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) discharge mortality among extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Study design This is a retrospective analysis of ELBW (<1000 g) and <27 weeks' gestational age infants born in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network sites between January 2000 and June 2007. Infants were tracked until death or 18 to 22 months' corrected age. Infants who died between NICU discharge and the 18- to 22-month follow-up visit were classified as post-NICU discharge mortality (P-NDM). Association of maternal and infant risk factors with P-NDM was determined using logistic regression analysis. A prediction model with 6 significant predictors was developed and validated. Results There were 5364 infants who survived to NICU discharge; 557 (10%) infants were lost to follow-up, and 107 infants died following NICU discharge. P-NDM rate was 22.3 per 1000 ELBW infants. In the prediction model, African American race, unknown maternal health insurance, and hospital stay >= 120 days significantly increased risk, and maternal exposure to intrapartum antibiotics was associated with decreased risk of P-NDM. Conclusion We identified African American race, unknown medical insurance, and prolonged NICU stay as risk factors associated with P-NDM among ELBW infants. (J Pediatr 2012;square:square-square)