• Journal Article

Resource planning for neglected tropical disease (NTD) control programs: Feasibility study of the tool for integrated planning and costing (TIPAC)

Citation

Wouters, O. J., Downs, P., Zoerhoff, K., Crowley, K., Frawley, H., Einberg, J., ... Yajima, A. (2014). Resource planning for neglected tropical disease (NTD) control programs: Feasibility study of the tool for integrated planning and costing (TIPAC). PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 8(2), e2619. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002619

Abstract

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and impose a large economic burden on endemic countries [1]. In 2006, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) founded the NTD Control Program to target five NTDs in African, Asian, and Latin American countries, namely, lymphatic filariasis (LF), onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH), and trachoma; the three targeted STH infections are ascariasis, hookworm, and trichuriasis. The NTD Control Program supported national NTD control and elimination programs' efforts to integrate and scale up delivery of preventive chemotherapy (PC) [2]. PC is the administration of safe, single-dose drugs, either alone or in combination, as a public health intervention against targeted NTDs. Administration is characterized by population-based diagnosis,population-based treatment,and implementation at regular intervals. PC can be delivered as universal chemotherapy (i.e., mass drug administration [MDA]), where the entire population of an area is targeted; targeted chemotherapy, where only high-risk groups (e.g., school age children) are targeted; or selective chemotherapy, where only screened individuals found or suspected to be infected are targeted [3]. Between October 2006 and March 2012, the program provided 589 million NTD treatments through the collaborative efforts of ministries of health, implementing partners, funders, and pharmaceutical donation programs.