• Report

A process and outcome evaluation of “Supporting Adolescents with Guidance and Employment (SAGE)”: A community-based violence prevention program for African American male adolescents

Citation

Flewelling, R., Paschall, M., Lissy, K., Burrus, B., Ringwalt, C., Graham, P., ... Browne, D. (1999). A process and outcome evaluation of “Supporting Adolescents with Guidance and Employment (SAGE)”: A community-based violence prevention program for African American male adolescents. (Final Report to: Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Grant No. U81/CCU408504-01). Research Triangle Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute.

Abstract

By the mid-1980s, interpersonal violence among African American male adolescents and
young adults was considered an epidemic and identified as a major public health issue. Despite
recent declines in violence (Fingerhut, Ingram, & Feldman, 1998; Tonry & Moore, 1998), violent
crime and homicide rates continue to be disproportionately high among African American males.
African American male adolescents and young adults are almost 10 times more likely than their
white male counterparts to be the victim of a homicide (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 1995).
While homicide represents the worst outcome associated with violence, it is estimated that 100
nonfatal violent incidents occur for every one homicide (Rosenberg & Mercy, 1986). These
statistics emphasize the need to identify and implement promising interventions that may prevent
violence and violence-related behavior in this at-risk population.