• Journal Article

Perceived message effectiveness to evaluate updated concepts for a national HIV testing campaign for African American women

Citation

Uhrig, J. D., Leeks, K. D., Stryker, J. E., Shadle, J., & Bann, C. M. (2017). Perceived message effectiveness to evaluate updated concepts for a national HIV testing campaign for African American women. Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 1-11. DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2017.1327143

Abstract

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched Take Charge. Take the Test.™, a national, communication campaign focused on the overarching goal of increasing HIV testing among African American women in March 2012. We surveyed 200 members of the campaign’s priority audience to inform selection of updated concepts for the campaign. Two of the potential concepts (Love Yourself More and Look Out for Yourself) were updated versions of the original campaign concepts, and three (Control of My Life, Personal Potential, and Strong Sisters) were newly developed. Look Out for Yourself and Love Yourself More had the highest mean ratings on the perceived effectiveness scale (PES) and were not significantly different from each other. Control of My Life had the third highest mean rating on the PES and was not significantly different from Love Yourself More. All three concepts were rated significantly higher than Personal Potential and Strong Sisters (P < 0.01). Across all concepts, prior intentions to get tested in the next 6 months was a positive, statistically significant predictor of the PES (P < 0.001). Higher perceived effectiveness was significantly associated with agreement that the concept motivated the respondent to get tested for HIV across all five concepts (P < 0.001). The findings support framing HIV testing as a matter of personal responsibility and emphasizing the importance of getting tested so that women can be there to participate in their children’s lives as effective messaging strategies for African American women.