• Journal Article

Optimization of immobilized enzyme hydrolysis combined with high-performance liquid chromatography/thermospray mass spectrometry for the determination of neuropeptides

Citation

Voyksner, R., Chen, D., & Swaisgood, H. E. (1990). Optimization of immobilized enzyme hydrolysis combined with high-performance liquid chromatography/thermospray mass spectrometry for the determination of neuropeptides. Analytical Biochemistry, 188(1), 72-81.

Abstract

Peptidases, including chymotrypsin, thermolysin, trypsin, V8 protease, and carboxypeptidases A, B, and Y, were immobilized for use in conjunction with HPLC/thermospray MS for the analysis of neuropeptides. The optimal operating conditions for each immobilized enzyme bioreactor were determined. Optimal hydrolysis usually occurred at the highest percentage of aqueous solution in the mobile phase at pH 7-8 and 40-50 degrees C. Often post-HPLC column addition of aqueous solutions before the bioreactor could improve activity and thermospray sensitivity without changing the HPLC separation. Enzymatic hydrolysis requirements were compatible under conditions for HPLC separation and thermospray MS detection of the selected neuropeptides. Synthetic alpha-, beta-, and gamma-endorphins were the primary neuropeptides used to evaluate on-line immobilized enzyme bioreactor/MS. HPLC followed by peptidase hydrolysis produced characteristic hydrolysis products for confirming the peptides' identity using thermospray MS detection. Furthermore, the peptide formed from enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in a MS ion current 10-40 times higher than that of the [M + 2H]2+ ion for unhydrolyzed beta-endorphin. The increased sensitivity achieved for detecting the hydrolysis products permits detection and quantitation of synthetic peptides down to 800 fmol