• Journal Article

New product trial, use of edibles, and unexpected highs among marijuana and hashish users in Colorado

Citation

Allen, J. A., Davis, K. C., Duke, J. C., Nonnemaker, J. M., Bradfield, B. R., & Farrelly, M. C. (2017). New product trial, use of edibles, and unexpected highs among marijuana and hashish users in Colorado. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 176, 44-47. DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.03.006

Abstract

Objective: This study examines the relationships between trial of new marijuana or hashish products and unexpected highs, and use of edible products and unexpected highs.

Methods: We conducted an online survey of 634 adult, past-year marijuana users in Colorado. We used logistic regression models to examine the relationship between new product trial or edible use and unexpected highs.

Results: In the first year that recreational marijuana was legal in Colorado, 71.4% of respondents tried a new marijuana or hashish product, and 53.6% used an edible product. Trial of new products was associated with greater odds of experiencing an unexpected high after controlling for age, gender, education, mental health status, current marijuana or hashish use, and mean amount of marijuana or hashish consumed in the past month (OR = 2.13, p <0.001). Individuals who reported having used edibles had greater odds of experiencing an unexpected high, after controlling for the same set of variables (OR = 1.56, p <0.05).

Conclusion: People who try new marijuana or hashish products, or use edible marijuana or hashish products, are at greater risk for an unexpected high. It is possible that some negative outcomes associated with marijuana use and unexpected highs may be averted through a better understanding of how to use product packaging to communicate with consumers.