• Report

The Multi-site Evaluation of SVORI: Methodology and analytic approach. The Multi-site Evaluation of the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative

Citation

Lattimore, P., & Steffey, D. (2009). The Multi-site Evaluation of SVORI: Methodology and analytic approach. The Multi-site Evaluation of the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. (Project is supported by Grant Number 2004-RE-CX-0002, awarded by the National Institute of Justice. Research Triangle Park, NC: RTI International and Washington, DC: Urban Institute). Unknown Publisher.

Abstract

This volume describes the methods and analytic approaches that were employed in conducting the Multi-site Evaluation of the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI). SVORI was a collaborative federal effort of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Labor (DOL), Department of Education (DoEd), Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The initiative responded to emerging research findings that suggested that providing incarcerated individuals with comprehensive, coordinated services based on needs and risk assessments could result in improved post-release outcomes (e.g., see Lattimore, 2007; National Research Council, 2007; Re-entry Policy Council, 2005; Visher, 2007).

In 2003, DOJ, DOL, DOEd, HUD, and HHS provided more than $100 million in grant funds to states to develop, enhance, or expand programs to facilitate the reentry of adult and juvenile offenders returning to communities from prisons or juvenile detention facilities. SVORI funded agencies to develop programs to improve criminal justice, employment, education, health, and housing outcomes for released prisoners. Sixty-nine agencies received federal funds ($500 thousand to $2 million over 3 years) to develop 89 programs. Grantees were to use their SVORI funding to create a three-phase continuum of services for returning serious or violent prisoners—services that began during the period of incarceration, intensified just before release and during the early months post-release, and continued for several years after release as former inmates took on more productive and independent roles in the community. In addition to the funding, SVORI encouraged agencies to coordinate with correctional and community partners and services.