• Article

Masculine Identity and HIV/AIDS Risk Behavior among African-American Men

There is a need for research that contributes to our understanding of how culturally shared gender ideals and expectations about men's behaviors influence HIV/AIDS risk. In the U.S., there has been a particular focus on masculinity among heterosexual, African-American men (see Wright 1993). African-American men, between 2001 and 2004, accounted for the greatest percentage of new cases of HIV/AIDS among males (44%), as well as 66% of all cases of heterosexual contact, with heterosexual contact being the second most common route of HIV transmission among this group after male to male sexual contact

Citation

Poehlman, J. (2008). Masculine Identity and HIV/AIDS Risk Behavior among African-American Men. Practicing Anthropology, 30(1), 12-17. DOI: 10.17730/praa.30.1.364003t536616278