• Journal Article

Latency of plasma membrane H-ATPase in vesicles isolated by aqueous phase partitioning : Increased substrate accessibility or enzyme activation

Citation

Sandstrom, R. P., Deboer, A. H., Lomax, T., & Cleland, R. E. (1987). Latency of plasma membrane H-ATPase in vesicles isolated by aqueous phase partitioning : Increased substrate accessibility or enzyme activation. Plant Physiology, 85(3), 693-698. DOI: 10.1104/pp.85.3.693

Abstract

The properties of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and the cause of its latency have been studied using a highly purified plasma membrane fraction from oat (Avena sativa L., cv Victory) roots, prepared by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The ATPase has a maximum specific activity (at 37 degrees C) in excess of 4 micromoles inorganic phosphate per milligram protein per minute in the presence of nondenaturing surfactants. It is inhibited by more than 90% by vanadate, is specific for ATP, has a pH optimum of 6.5, and is stimulated more than 4-fold by 50 millimolar K(+) in the presence of low levels of the nondenaturing surfactants Triton X-100 and lysolecithin. This ;latent' activity is usually explained as being a result of the inability of ATP to reach the ATPase in right-side out, sealed vesicles, until they are disrupted by surfactants. Consistent with this idea, trypsin digestion significantly inhibited the ATPase only in the presence of the surfactants. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy volume measurements confirmed that surfactant-free vesicles were mostly sealed to molecules similar to ATP. However, the Triton to protein ratio required to disrupt vesicle integrity completely is 10-fold less than that needed to promote maximum ATPase activity. We propose that plasma membrane ATPase activation is due not solely to vesicle disruption and accessibility of ATP to the ATPase but to the surfactants activating the ATPase by altering the lipid environment in its vicinity or by removing an inhibitory subunit