• Article

Infant cardiac activity: Developmental changes and relations with attachment

In this study the stability over the first 13 mo of life of measures of infant cardiac activity (heart period and heart-period variability), their relations with each other, and their relations with a continuous-variable index of infant–mother attachment were investigated. The indexes of cardiac activity changed in an orderly way with development (increasing heart-rate variability, decreasing heart rate). There were moderate to high intercorrelations among the cardiac measures, particularly those indexing heart-rate variability (i.e., vagal tone, heart-period variance, and heart-period range). Regression analyses showed that the measures of heart-rate variability at 3, 6, and 9 mo were significant predictors of the continuous-variable index of security. The higher the infants' heart-rate variability, the higher were their attachment insecurity scores. Analyses of whether the conventional secure/insecure classification was related to the early infant cardiac measures indicated that measures of heart-rate variability were significantly higher in the insecure children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Citation

Izard, CE., Porges, S., Simons, RF., Haynes, OM., Hyde, C., Parisi, M., & Cohen, B. (1991). Infant cardiac activity: Developmental changes and relations with attachment. Developmental Psychology, 27(3), 432-439. DOI: 10.1037/0012-1649.27.3.432