• Report

Increasing vocational options for students with learning handicaps: A practical guide

Citation

Eagle, E., Choy, S., Hoachlander, E. G., Stoddard, S., & Tuma, J. (1989). Increasing vocational options for students with learning handicaps: A practical guide. Berkeley, CA: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, University of California, Berkeley.

Abstract

Because of a learning disability and behavioral problems, David was placed in a self-contained special education class in the third grade. His behavior improved in this setting, but because his attention span was short and his behavior disruptive unless he was closely supervised, David remained in special education classes through the sixth grade.

Without the special programs available in his school, David's problems would have kept him from pursuing vocational training. Fortunately, his school district began preparing him for the world of work even during the junior high years and continued special efforts toward this goal through his graduation.

In junior high school, David's Individual Education Plan (IEP) called for him to spend most of the day in a special education class, but he attended mainstream art and physical education classes. He tried hard, but in the eighth grade, David performed only at the sixth grade level in math and the fourth grade level in reading. In addition, his short attention span still caused problems.