• Conference Proceeding

Impact of managed care on treatment for pregnant drug-dependent women and their children

Citation

Jansson, L., Svikis, D., Velez, M., & Jones, H. (2002). Impact of managed care on treatment for pregnant drug-dependent women and their children. In [22], pp. 312–313. .

Abstract

Pregnant drug-dependent women present for treatment with a myriad of medical and psychosocial problems, which can be costly to both the healthcare system and to society. Previous research has shown that integrated, comprehensive services are both clinically and economically effective for this group (Svikis et al., 1997; Jansson et al., 1996). With the advent of managed care (MC), limitations have been imposed on quantity and frequency of services for this high-risk patient population. Previous investigators have found that although MC did contain costs for treatment of substance abusers, it was also associated with decreased value of drug treatment benefits, decreased availability of appropriate care, and the decreased autonomy of clinicians to make treatment decisions for their patients (Galanter et al., 2000). The population of pregnant, drug-dependent women is especially at risk for curtailment of services under the system of MC, as this population often requires many costly, long-term services provided by a variety of practitioners, many specialists.