• Journal Article

Have repeated applications of nitrogen and phosphorus to a loblolly pine plantation changed stand productivity and soil nutrient supply?

Citation

Phelan, J., & Allen, H. L. (2008). Have repeated applications of nitrogen and phosphorus to a loblolly pine plantation changed stand productivity and soil nutrient supply? Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 38(3), 637-644. DOI: 10.1139/X07-131

Abstract

To develop a nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization regime that produces long-term increases in stand productivity and soil nutrient supply in loblolly pine plantations, a series of N + P fertilizer studies were established in the Southeastern United States. One of these installations was examined partway through the study to determine if changes to stand productivity and soil nutrient supply had already been achieved. Stand growth and foliar nutrient concentrations were measured for 6 years, and during the third year, a seedling bioassay was conducted with soil collected from the highest fertilization and nonfertilized treatments. Annual stand growth was increased by 14%–27% in the fertilized plots suggesting that the fertilizer regime improved stand productivity. However, results from the seedling bioassay showed that only P fertilization had caused changes in soil nutrient supply. Seedling P contents in the fertilized treatments were 3.6 times larger than those in the nonfertilized treatments. In contrast, total system N contents were equivalent in the fertilized and nonfertilized systems, and extractable nitrate (NO3–), ammonium (NH4+), and biologically active N were higher in the nonfertilized soils. Future measurements and seedlings bioassay assessments should be conducted to determine when and if long-term changes in soil quality and stand productivity are achieved.