• Journal Article

Exploring the differences and similarities between black/African and coloured men regarding violence against women, substance abuse, and HIV risks in Cape Town, South Africa

Citation

Sawyer-Kurian, K. M., Wechsberg, W., & Luseno, W. (2009). Exploring the differences and similarities between black/African and coloured men regarding violence against women, substance abuse, and HIV risks in Cape Town, South Africa. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 10(1), 13-29. DOI: 10.1037/a0013267

Abstract

Existing research often reports HIV risks, men's relationships with women, substance abuse, and violence among Black/African and Coloured men in Cape Town, South Africa, without making note of possible cultural distinctions. Because of apartheid, race has historically affected the social and economic circumstances of many men differently; therefore, our research aimed to explore cultural nuances as they relate to HIV risk, substance use, and violence. Focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample (N = 33) of men in local townships. Of the sample, 29 reported having multiple sex partners. Both groups of men reported having multiple relationship categories--main sex partner, casual partner, and one-night stand-with each having different sexual and behavioral expectations. Black/African men mainly used alcohol and cannabis, whereas Coloured men mainly used alcohol, methamphetamine, and cannabis. Coloured men reported that while using methamphetamine, they often planned to get a woman high so that several men could rape her without resistance. In contrast, Black/African men reported their use of alcohol and drugs as it related to one-on-one rape. Important cultural distinctions may inform future adaptations to interventions.