• Report

Enrollment, completion, attrition, and vocational course-taking patterns in postsecondary education: A comparison of 1972 and 1980 high school graduates entering two-year institutions. High School and Beyond, National Longitudinal Study of 1972. Survey re

Citation

Horn, L., & Carroll, C. D. (1989). Enrollment, completion, attrition, and vocational course-taking patterns in postsecondary education: A comparison of 1972 and 1980 high school graduates entering two-year institutions. High School and Beyond, National Longitudinal Study of 1972. Survey report. Contractor report (CS-89-360). Washington, DC: National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES); U.S. Department of Education.

Abstract

Information about the educational progress of 1972 high school seniors from the National Longitudinal Study (NLS) and information from the High School and Beyond (HS&B) Study about 1980 high school seniors were analyzed to compare the patterns of enrollment, program completion, dropout rates, and vocational course-taking patterns of members of the 1972 and 1980 cohorts who entered two-year institutions. Study findings included the following: (1) rates of enrollment in two-year colleges were higher in 1980 than in 1972 regardless of sex, race or ethnicity, or parental education; (2) Hispanic students enrolled in two-year colleges at higher rates than Black students in 1972 and at higher rates than either Black or White students in 1980; (3) the HS&B students had lower rates of degree completion than the NLS students among males, White students, affluent students, and students whose parent(s) had a bachelor's degree or higher; (4) dropout rates were higher among 1980 graduates than 1972 graduates regardless of sex, socioeconomic status, or parental education; (5) approximately equal proportions of students entered vocational programs in 1972 and 1980; (6) vocational students had higher overall dropout rates than the whole student body in both groups; (7) while the average number of vocational credits earned remained steady between the NLS and HS&B studies, the average number of academic credits earned dropped; and (8) computer science, business management, business support, marketing and distribution, and communications programs experienced an overall increase in the proportion of students earning credits from 1972 to 1980. (JMC)