• Conference Proceeding

Electrostatic artificial eyelid actuator as an analog micromirror device

Citation

Murrer, J. r. (Ed.). (2005). Electrostatic artificial eyelid actuator as an analog micromirror device. In Technologies for Synthetic Environments: Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing X, [5785], pp. 59–67. .

Abstract

An electrostatic MEMS actuator is described for use as an analog micromirror device (AMD) for high performance, broadband, hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) scene generation. Current state-of-the-art technology is based on resistively heated pixel arrays. As these arrays drive to the higher scene temperatures required by missile defense scenarios, the power required to drive the large format resistive arrays will ultimately become prohibitive. Existing digital micromirrors (DMD) are, in principle, capable of generating the required scene irradiances, but suffer from limited dynamic range, resolution and flicker effects. An AMD would be free of these limitations, and so represents a viable alternative for high performance UV/VIS/IR scene generation. An electrostatic flexible film actuator technology, developed for use as "artificial eyelid" shutters for focal plane sensors to protect against damaging radiation, is suitable as an AMD for analog control of projection irradiance. In shutter applications, the artificial eyelid actuator contained radius of curvature as low as 25um and operated at high voltage (>200V). Recent testing suggests that these devices are capable of analog operation as reflective microcantilever mirrors appropriate for scene projector systems. In this case, the device would possess larger radius and operate at lower voltages (20-50V). Additionally, frame rates have been measured at greater than 5kHz for continuous operation. The paper will describe the artificial eyelid technology, preliminary measurements of analog test pixels, and design aspects related to application for scene projection systems. We believe this technology will enable AMD projectors with at least 5122 spatial resolution, non-temporally-modulated output, and pixel response times of