• Journal Article

The effect of recombinant activated factor VII in the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage on health plan budgets

Citation

Earnshaw, S., & Wilson, M. (2007). The effect of recombinant activated factor VII in the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage on health plan budgets. Managed Care Interface, 19(11), 39-45.

Abstract

Treating patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) using recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIla) has been found to improve survival and functional outcome. To examine how the introduction of rFVIla 80 microg/kg as a treatment for ICH affects the budget of a health plan, a decision-analysis model was developed which considered both short-term hospitalization costs and long-term management of disability. Assuming a health plan enrollment of 1 million members and initial rFVIla uptake of 50% in appropriate patients, the annual health plan cost may be expected to increase by dollar 64,781 (dollar 0.005 per-member per-month). With a 5% increase in uptake each year, the annual health plan's cost may decrease compared with the current budget within three years. The implications for this sample health plan's budget are modest in the first year, and a reduction in costs is expected within three years owing to improved functional outcomes of patients