• Presentation

Does the Introductory Context Affect Reporting of Victimization and Perpetration in a National Survey of Intimate Partner Violence or Sexual Violence?

Citation

Carley-Baxter, L., Link, M. W., Roe, D., & Quiroz, R. S. (2007, May). Does the Introductory Context Affect Reporting of Victimization and Perpetration in a National Survey of Intimate Partner Violence or Sexual Violence?. Presented at American Association for Public Opinion Research Conference, Anaheim, CA.

Abstract

Previous research has shown that the way a survey is introduced to potential respondents can have an impact on participation rates and participant responses. Obtaining accurate survey estimates is very important for determining prevalence estimates for intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) since these tend to be under-reported crimes. Accurate prevalence estimates for IPV and SV are also important because of the policy and programmatic implications that such estimates have; such estimates inform decisions regarding how best to use limited resources in the development of effective prevention and intervention programs. As part of the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Pilot Study, we evaluated the impact of three survey introductory contexts on reporting of IPV and SV victimization and perpetration and on the behavior estimates obtained. Prior to fielding the survey, cases were randomly assigned to one of three contexts: crime, health, or personal relationships. The randomly assigned introductory context was used throughout the survey as the main reference to the survey topic. In addition, 18 questions were asked early in the survey to further focus the participant on the randomly assigned context (e.g., questions about break-ins for the crime context, questions about health care providers for the health context). In the analysis, we compared response and refusal rates between the three different introductory contexts used. We also compared reporting of specific behaviors for stalking, sexual violence, physical violence, and negative emotional behaviors.