• Conference Proceeding

Developing aerosol vaccines for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Workshop proceedings: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, April 9, 2014

Citation

Achkar, J., Beverley, P., Boom, H., Evans, T., Hanekom, W., Hickey, A., ... (2015). Developing aerosol vaccines for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Workshop proceedings: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, April 9, 2014. In [33], pp. 3038–3046. .

Abstract

On April 9, 2014, Aeras and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a workshop entitled “Developing Aerosol Vaccines for Mycobacterium tuberculosis” in Bethesda, MD. The purpose of the meeting was to explore the potential for developing aerosol vaccines capable of preventing infection with M. tuberculosis (Mtb), preventing the development of active tuberculosis (TB) among those latently infected with Mtb, or as immunotherapy for persons with active TB. The workshop was organized around four key questions relevant to developing and assessing aerosol TB vaccines: (1) What is the current knowledge about lung immune responses and early pathogenesis resulting after Mtb infection and what are the implications for aerosol TB vaccine strategies? (2) What are the technical issues surrounding aerosol vaccine delivery? (3) What is the current experience in aerosol TB vaccine development? and (4) What are the regulatory implications of developing aerosol vaccines, including those for TB? Lessons learned from the WHO effort to develop an aerosol measles vaccine served as a case example for overall discussions at the meeting. Workshop participants agreed that aerosol delivery represents a potentially important strategy in advancing TB vaccine development efforts. As no major regulatory, manufacturing or clinical impediments were identified, members of the workshop emphasized the need for greater support to further explore the potential for this delivery methodology, either alone or as an adjunct to traditional parenteral methods of vaccine administration.