• Presentation

Cross-national measurement of the religion effects and its application on public attitude toward science and technology in european new member countries

Citation

Liao, D., Palmer, D., Jiang, L., Liu, X., & McCutcheon, A. (2009, May). Cross-national measurement of the religion effects and its application on public attitude toward science and technology in european new member countries. Presented at Annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, May 25, .

Abstract

Debate between contradicting religious beliefs and scientific theories are not limited to philosophical settings. These debates are often at the heart of policy decisions regarding science and technology research. A nation’s religious atmosphere may influence not only the amount of money and effort the country invests in science and technology research, but also the types of research that are pursued. In May 2004, ten candidate countries, Bulgaria, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey, joined the European Union (EU). Because eight of these ten countries were previously under communist rule, their religious atmospheres are different from veteran EU members. These differences need to be understood and anticipated because they may translate into policy conflicts between veteran and new member countries.
The Cross-national measurement for the effects of religion on public opinion was attracted increased attention from social scientists over the past decade. The current research focuses the impact of religious belief on public attitude towards science and technology. The analysis examines the influences of individuals’ religious belief and religiosity, as well as these variables’ interactions with age and gender on response rates and responses toward science and technology within each new member country of the EU and the comparisons of the effects across countries are next performed. The data are from a series of surveys modeled on the Standard Eurobarometer in the candidate countries of the European Union, conducted by the Gallup Organization-Hungary in September 2002.