• Conference Proceeding

Contingent Incentives Reduce Cigarette Smoking Among Methadone-Maintained Pregnant Women

Citation

Lund, I. O., Tuten, M., Fitzsimons, H., Chisolm, M., & Jones, H. E. (2011). Contingent Incentives Reduce Cigarette Smoking Among Methadone-Maintained Pregnant Women. In [30], pp. 57–57. .

Abstract

Introduction and Aims: This study examines the effi cacy of contingent behavioural incentives for reducing cigarette smoking among pregnant methadone-maintained patients.
Design and Methods: Pregnant methadone-maintained patients were randomly assigned to: (i) contingent behavioural incentives for cigarette smoking reductions (CBI: n = 42); (ii) behavioural incentives not contingent on cigarette smoking reduction (NCBI: n = 28); and (iii) a treatment as usual control condition (TAU: n = 32). Breath samples were tested for carbon monoxide levels using the Smokerlyzer® CO monitor three times per week to measure changes in smoking behaviour.
Results: Thirty days before treatment entry, participants averaged 29 days of cigarette smoking, almost a pack a day. Across the outpatient intervention (weeks 2–12), the CBI condition submitted significantly lower mean CO values than the TAU and NCBI conditions (F = 18.050, p participants, only 2% of the TAU participants met the 75% reduction. The three conditions did not signifi cantly differ on any of the measures of maternal or neonatal delivery outcomes.
Conclusions: These data support the effi cacy of contingent behavioural incentives using shaping procedures for making meaningful changes in quantity of cigarette smoking in methadonemaintained women during pregnancy.