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Studies: Liquor Store Density Linked To Youth Violence

RTI in the Media

  • KCAL-TV (Los Angeles)

September 10, 2011

Violent crime could be reduced significantly if cities limit the number of neighborhood liquor stores and ban the sale of single-serve containers of alcoholic beverages. That’s according to separate studies led by UC Riverside researchers.

Liquor Store Density Linked To Youth Homicides

RTI in the Media

  • Red Orbit

September 06, 2011

Violent crime could be reduced significantly if policymakers at the local level limit the number of neighborhood liquor stores and ban the sale of single-serve containers of alcoholic beverages, according to separate studies led by University of Cali

RTI toxicologist Tyl to advise public health standards body NSF

RTI in the Media

  • MedCity News

September 06, 2011

A senior toxicologist at RTI International whose expertise includes research on bisphenol A, or BPA, a chemical found in food containers and household products, will now advise the National Sanitation Foundation International on reproductive and toxi

What Factors Influence Adherence to Treatment for Hepatitis C?

RTI in the Media

  • HIV and Hepatitis

August 31, 2011

Efficacy, or likelihood of achieving sustained virological response, was the most important factor influencing adherence among people considering treatment for chronic hepatitis C, according to a recent survey.

NIH updates its conflict of interest guidelines

RTI in the Media

  • British Medical Journal

August 30, 2011

Last week the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) published its long awaited final rule on conflicts of interest.1 2 In doing so it tried to balance the benefits of increased disclosure of financial connections between NIH funded investigators and

Do TV Ads Correcting Misleading Statements by Drug Companies Work?

RTI in the Media

  • Pharmacy Choice

August 30, 2011

When drug companies exaggerate or misstate the benefits or risks of medications in their advertising campaigns, the Food and Drug Administration may ask them to set the record straight by running "corrective advertisements."

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