Occupational exposure to methamphetamine in workers preparing training aids for drug detection dogs.

Citation

Stout, P.R., Horn, C.K., Klette, K.L., & Given, J. (2006). Occupational exposure to methamphetamine in workers preparing training aids for drug detection dogs.. Journal of Analytical Toxicology, 30 (8):551-553.

Abstract

As a part of ongoing testing of personnel preparing training aids for drug detection dogs at the Naval Criminal Investigative Service Regional Forensic Laboratory, personnel handling methamphetamine (MTH) were subject to voluntary urine drug testing. This provided a model of potential unwitting or environmental exposure contribution to MTH concentrations in urine. Urine samples were collected from multiple individuals on the day before, the day of, and the day after the individuals had handled up to 500-g quantities of MTH during the assembly of training aids. Personnel wore gloves, dust masks, and lab coats during the preparation of training aids. A total of 101 urine samples were analyzed for the presence of MTH and amphetamine (AMP) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction and derivatization. Urine samples collected during and after personnel handled drug yielded a mean MTH concentration of 48 ng/mL with a maximum concentration of 262 ng/mL and a minimum detected concentration of approximately 1.6 ng/mL. Thirty-five of the 52 post drug-handling samples had detectable MTH. Ten of the samples had MTH concentrations above the method limit of quantitation of 15 ng/mL. Only one sample had a concentration greater than 50 ng/mL. None of the samples had detectable AMP. From this limited study, it was evident that handling of MTH under these conditions resulted in minimal exposure and small but detectable concentrations of MTH in urine.