• Journal Article

Differences in blood pressure and vascular responses associated with ambient fine particulate matter exposures measured at the personal versus community level

Citation

Brook, R. D., Bard, R. L., Burnett, R. T., Shin, H. H., Vette, A., Croghan, C., ... Williams, R. (2011). Differences in blood pressure and vascular responses associated with ambient fine particulate matter exposures measured at the personal versus community level. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 68(3), 224–230.

Abstract

Background Higher ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels can be associated with increased blood pressure and vascular dysfunction. Objectives To determine the differential effects on blood pressure and vascular function of daily changes in community ambient-versus personal-level PM2.5 measurements. Methods Cardiovascular outcomes included vascular tone and function and blood pressure measured in 65 non-smoking subjects. PM2.5 exposure metrics included 24 h integrated personal- (by vest monitors) and community-based ambient levels measured for up to 5 consecutive days (357 observations). Associations between community-and personal-level PM2.5 exposures with alterations in cardiovascular outcomes were assessed by linear mixed models. Results Mean daily personal and community measures of PM2.5 were 21.9 +/- 24.8 and 15.4 +/- 7.5 mu g/m(3), respectively. Community PM2.5 levels were not associated with cardiovascular outcomes. However, a 10 mu g/m(3) increase in total personal-level PM2.5 exposure (TPE) was associated with systolic blood pressure elevation (+1.41 mm Hg; lag day 1, p